EASIEST PIZZA DOUGH RECIPE — EVER

dough rested

EASIEST PIZZA DOUGH RECIPE — EVER

This amazing beauty you see to the right, this golden and slightly covered in mini cheese shavings crust, THIS crispy on the outside but SOFT and CHEWY on the inside yumminess with cheesy, greatness on top  is literally the EASIEST pizza dough I’ve ever made.  And its going to be the easiest one you’ve ever made too!  Because this post, is going to show you just how to make it.

I’ve tried so many different pizza dough recipes, it is.. insane.  I’ve tried recipes that require you to sit yeast in warm water that has to be a VERY particular temperature! I’ve tried recipes that require you to sift half in, then add the other half at a percent of a hair of a pinch then fold in — yada yada ya.  I’ve even tried recipe’s that call for potatoes!  That, is actually a great idea — more on that one a little later…

Now, following a … more complex pizza dough recipe is not all bad.  You will still come out with a crazy delicious pizza.  The only con to it is, there is a smidge more margin for error.  What if your temperature isn’t right?  How do you know if you’ve knead the dough enough? Or, too much? Sheesh..

In a pan crust pizza, I’m looking for three things.  Is it soft?  Is the exterior golden and crispy?  Is the crust crisp on the outside and like actual bread on the inside?  I don’t want that chewy, waxy stuff.  I need the real deal.

This recipe does not require you to soak for any period of time, you don’t need any extra gadgets and gizmo’s a plenty.  You need your hands, a little love in your heart and the determination to make your own at home pizza.

TO THE TIPS | TO THE RECIPE
   
golden crusted pizza

I like two different types of crust — I like a thin crust, where I can cut the pizza into squares and eat majority of the slices without feeling a smidge of guilt.  And I like a classic pan pizza where the crust is crispy on the outside, but soft and chewy on the inside.  That crust typically compliments a deep dish pizza REALLY well.  It also is strong enough to hold the ingredients – should you decide to overload your pizza to maximum capacity with great ingredients.

There are times, however, that call for a more modest pizza.  Where it’s not as heavy as a deep dish pizza, but still gives you a decent thickness to the crust and all the enjoyable parts of a buttery, oily, cheesy piece of bread covered in all the fixings!  

Honest moment here; my crust has NEVER come out a perfect as the original recipe I would follow, has shown it to be — and it has left me questioning whether I even made it right.  Did my pizza dough come out as delicious as the recipe mentions it would be?  Did I over-knead the dough?  And why is it that, this recipe mentions I only need so much ice water, but my dough has definitely not created the form that this recipe said it should.  Now, that didn’t stop me from making or eating the pizza.. but at times it was less than enjoyable and left me feeling like.. “Forget this!”

Below are some tips that can help in your journey of making the easiest crust ever.  I’ve made efforts to try to take as many photos of the dough as possible.  The goal was that as you make your crust you can compare yours and feel confident that what you’re making, is going to come out just as delicious — because let’s face it; crust never comes out as perfect as they do in someone else’s photos.

TIPS

  • Careful not to over-knead your dough!  The more you manipulate flour, the tougher it becomes.  Essentially, with every time you knead, you are tightening the gluten. Dough that has not been kneaded enough has more elasticity — so it will not be as sturdy.  So maybe, when you’re kneading just keep in mind, you don’t want doughnuts! Keep kneading to a minimum.  Maybe a minute tops.   
  • If you feel as though you have over kneaded the dough, you can combat this by allowing the dough to rise for a little longer than the normal rise time.  The more time it has to rest the better.
  • Cant keep your dough in a perfect circle?  Neither  can I, so I don’t have any tips to help you do that! HOWEVER, the closest I’ve come is, shaping the dough in a circle and as you roll out the dough, do either of the following: 1. ) Roll the roller against every edge of the circle. Gently. 2. ) Rotate the dough in a circle as you roll it.  
  • Let it rest!  The longer the better, of course!  But, on those times you just can’t wait a full 24 hours before eating dinner .. give it at least two hours.  The ingredients absolutely have to have time together.  Also, this recipe does not require you to soak your yeast.  So it has to do its thing at some point.
  • For a nice crust, use the palms of your hand and flatten the center of your dough, so that the edges naturally appear to be round and thicker.  You can also roll and tuck the  left over pieces of crust, as if you were stuffing with cheese, but keep in mind your dough will be much thicker when rolling and tucking.
  • Do NOT substitute all-purpose flour for bread flour.  Bread flour is designed to absorb more water and will give you a stick dough — which is more ideal.
  • If you have a baking stone, this is amazing!  If you have a cast iron skillet, this works great also!  Either of the two options will give you an ideal crust!

In the image shown to the right, the dough is very sticky in texture and appears lumpy — needs kneading.  However, when mixing the oil and salt, you will notice that the dough will start to smooth out significantly and will be perfect for kneading.  

This recipe can make two 12″ pizzas, or one really large and a smaller, personal pan pizza or a medium sized thin crust.  The choice is yours and if you are making personal pizzas and anticipate making one later in the week, you can store this dough in the fridge for up to two weeks!

Be sure to keep it tightly wrapped in saran wrap to avoid air from drying out the dough. If this is not an option for you and you’d rather not keep ingredients stored in your fridge for extended periods of time, consider halving all ingredients!

dough resting in oil
dough rested

GET THE RECIPE

Yields1 Serving

 3 cups Bread Flour
 5 ½ tsp Salt
 2 tsp Granulated Sugar
 ½ tsp Yeast
 3 ⅔ cups Ice Cold Water
 1 tbsp Vegetable Oil

1

In a mixer or food processor add bread flour, sugar and yeast. Mix well until all ingredients are completely integrated.

2

While still mixing, begin to pour in ice water into the bread flour, sugar and yeast mixture until well combined. Once combined, stop the mixer or food processor and let the dough rest for about 12 to 15 minutes.

3

Add salt and vegetable oil to the dough and begin to mix again until the dough has become sticky and removes all remnants from the sides of the bowl or processor.

4

Once the dough has completely removed the remnants from the sides of the bowl, knead the dough gently for about one minute. Shape the dough into a ball and let rest while you lightly oil a bowl to move the dough into.

5

Move the dough into lightly oiled bowl, cover tightly with saran wrap or with a thick towel and rubber band around the sides of the bowl and set in the fridge for a 24 hours — or overnight.

Ingredients

 3 cups Bread Flour
 5 ½ tsp Salt
 2 tsp Granulated Sugar
 ½ tsp Yeast
 3 ⅔ cups Ice Cold Water
 1 tbsp Vegetable Oil

Directions

1

In a mixer or food processor add bread flour, sugar and yeast. Mix well until all ingredients are completely integrated.

2

While still mixing, begin to pour in ice water into the bread flour, sugar and yeast mixture until well combined. Once combined, stop the mixer or food processor and let the dough rest for about 12 to 15 minutes.

3

Add salt and vegetable oil to the dough and begin to mix again until the dough has become sticky and removes all remnants from the sides of the bowl or processor.

4

Once the dough has completely removed the remnants from the sides of the bowl, knead the dough gently for about one minute. Shape the dough into a ball and let rest while you lightly oil a bowl to move the dough into.

5

Move the dough into lightly oiled bowl, cover tightly with saran wrap or with a thick towel and rubber band around the sides of the bowl and set in the fridge for a 24 hours — or overnight.

pizza dough

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